DataTalks.Club

Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures

by Marcello La Rocca

The book of the week from 31 May 2021 to 04 Jun 2021

As a software engineer, you’ll encounter countless programming challenges that initially seem confusing, difficult, or even impossible. Don’t despair! Many of these “new” problems already have well-established solutions. Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures teaches you powerful approaches to a wide range of tricky coding challenges that you can adapt and apply to your own applications. Providing a balanced blend of classic, advanced, and new algorithms, this practical guide upgrades your programming toolbox with new perspectives and hands-on techniques.

Questions and Answers

Alex

Hi there, Marcello La Rocca! Pleasure having you around here 😄
As an aspiring data scientist, I hear many different opinions regarding algos and data structures: some say they are really a must in order to succeed, and others say it is not fundamentally needed in order to carry out a decent job. What’s your opinion on this? Is it really that important to manage them well? Or can you decently make it without going too deep on the subject?
Thanks a lot!

Rodney Silva

I also had this doubt when I started to learn data science. It’s good to know the basics,but rarely someone will ask about algorithms during interviews.

Marcello La Rocca

Hi Alex, thanks, it’s a pleasure for me as well!
(Thanks a lot to Alexey Grigorev for inviting me!)
So, that’s a great question, thanks for asking!
The short version is, it depends on what you are working on and where.

Marcello La Rocca

I believe you strictly need some knowledge of the basis everywhere today, and then in some roles is naturally more likely than others to have to deal with algorithms in depth: anything related to research, any job where you have to deal with high volumes of data, there you are more likely to need some more-than-basic knowledge about algorithms and data structures; also in backend jobs it’s probably more likely than in frontend ones (although you should take this with a grain of salt, like al generalizations).
Orthogonally to those considerations: some companies, regardless of the position, have interview processes that are heavily based on questions on algorithms and data structures, so depending on what’s your target, you might want
to get to a certain level on the subject.

Marcello La Rocca

That said, I can also give you some reasons why (IMHO) studying about algorithms and data structures can can help any developer being “their best possible version”:

  1. Performance: choosing the right algorithm can speed your application up dramatically: if we take something like search, on large volumes of data it makes a world of difference going from linear search to binary search to (possibly) Grover algorithm. Likewise, for a simpler task like adding elements to a list, if you do know that adding to the head or to the tail of the list changes the performance of the task, you are less likely to fall for mistakes that can slow down and crash you app (I’ve seen this several times in production, last time was not longer than a few months ago)
  2. Security: if you choose the wrong algorithm, an attacker can use it to crash your server/node/application. Consider, for instance, the hash DoS attack, where the use of a hash table as a dictionary to store variables sent with POST requests was leveraged to overload it with a sequence causing a huge number of collisions, and this in turn would make a server unresponsive. Another interesting example was how flawed random number generators allowed hacking online poker sites.
  3. Efficiency in designing code: if you already know there exist building blocks for whatever you’d like to accomplish, you will be faster in developing it, and the result will be cleaner (especially if you reuse code). For instance, if you know what caches are for and how to use them, you won’t likely need to write your own custom container, rather you’ll directly go and search for an existing library that does what you need.
Alex

awesome, thanks a lot for the reply! that being said, I understand that your book is focused on advanced algos and data structures. is there any book recommendation for non-technicals (I come from Economics) to get a good grasp on the subject first?

Marcello La Rocca

Morning Alex !
So, if you’d like to get started with algorithms, certainly Grokking Algorithms can be a good starting point.
Besides that, it really depends on what you’d like to learn, and what kind of algorithms you’d be interested in… can you tell me a little more?
Like, for instance, would you be interested in machine learning, or algorithms to process data, or networks… you tell me 🙂

Alex

Awesome! Will add that one to my collection as well 😄
In regards to what kind of algorithms, I’d say pure CS algorithms related to data processing would be great given my job requirements.
Thanks again, Marcello La Rocca!

Marcello La Rocca

Hi Alex, sorry for the delay, I wanted to search out some links that I wanted to send you.
So, if you are interested in data-oriented algorithms, I’d suggest https://www.manning.com/books/algorithms-and-data-structures-for-massive-datasets
If you are also interested in the basics of Machine Learning, don’t miss https://www.manning.com/books/grokking-machine-learning
Both are great books!
But if you also would like to have an overview focused on the non-technical angle, I wanted to suggest you might take a look at these MOOCs:
https://www.edx.org/course/artificial-intelligence-for-everyone
https://mit-online.getsmarter.com/presentations/lp/mit-machine-learning-online-short-course
Is that something that might interest you? Meanwhile, I’ll try to think harder about other resources I could recommend to you!

Alex

Thanks a lot, Marcello! I really appreciate the reply. Will give them a look for sure :) have a lovely day!

Marcello La Rocca

Nice!
Thanks, you too!

Tino

Hey Marcello La Rocca 🙂 Do you see a trend in interview questions which refer to algos and data structures? I heard Google e.g. relies heavily on this whereas other companies less. So should advanced knowledge be interviewed by more companies? And does this help to understand pre-implemented classes/algorithms like in scitkit-learn, etc. easier?

Marcello La Rocca

Hi Tino, thanks for your question!
Yes, definitely, many large companies rely, for their interview process, on algorithms (and in general on challenge-like questions, the kind of questions you can find on codewars etc., just to be clear).
I myself had my fair share of algorithmic questions when I interviewed with the likes of Google and Twitter! There are also many other companies (including tundra.com, where I currently work) that tries different ways, balancing algorithmic questions with questions closer to the daily work that candidates would have to perform in case they joined the company.

Marcello La Rocca

In general it depends a lot on where you are applying, so my best advice is to target your preparation on the job/company you are applying
(incidentally, I’m writing a piece with some advice for interviews on https://dev.to/mlarocca, hopefully it will be out next weekend, if you’d like to take a look)

Marcello La Rocca

As for the second part of your question: knowing the inside out of algorithms in libraries it’s not strictly necessary, but it can help you to decide better which algorithm to apply, and to understand better what to expect in terms of final result, but also resources needed.
For instance, especially with stochastic algorithms and heuristics, it’s important to understand if you can expect to get always the best possible result, or even a correct result, and how much resources you’ll need (usually compared to other alternatives)

Tino

Hey Marcello La Rocca that is amazing! Thanks so much for the insights 🙂

Marcello La Rocca

You are welcome! 🙂

Agrita Ga

Hei Marcello La Rocca. 👏 Are there any algorithms or data structures - in your opinion - that are underused or underappreciated? Or, then as well, algorithms/data structures that are heavily misused or overused (due to buzz or just because of familiarity)?

Marcello La Rocca

Hi! This is a very good question, really interesting. Let me give it some proper thought, and I’ll try to answer it at my best at the end of the round🙂

Marcello La Rocca

So, here we are: this is probably one of the most challenging questions for today, so I left it for last! Thanks a lot Agrita Ga for asking!
Let’s see, the first part: underused algos/DSs.
For sure, I’d argue that there are many of the simplest ones that could be used more and improve performance, while sometimes they are just overlooked.
For instance:

  • The binary search algorithm can provide a huge speedup in search if the collection to search is stable and can be ordered once, but often this is just overlooked and linear search on an unordered set is used.
  • Speaking of, adaptive sorting algorithms are massively underused and underknown! When you have a list/array that is changing slowly (low write/search ratio) and you need to keep it sorted, using an adaptive algorithm can outperform quicksort by several orders of magnitudes.
  • I’d say maybe Disjoint sets are also underused (but also underappreciated, which I’ll tackle next)
Marcello La Rocca

So, part 2: underappreciated algorithms:

  1. Disjoint sets, because they are clever and fast, but since there are already slower but simpler alternatives which are still linear or sublinear, they tend to be implemented sparingly
  2. Discrete Fourier Transform. I mean, it’s certainly well appreciated, but not many people appreciate how fundamental it is
Marcello La Rocca

part 3: overused and misused
That’s a tricky question 😄
This usually depends on the problem you re trying to solve, any algorithm can be an overkill for some problems.
Familiarity is of course one of the most likely reasons to overuse something (see the Maslow’s hammer rule 🙂 ), but that’s mainly subjective.
Related to hype, instead, today I’d say that some machine learning algorithms, or machine learning in general, are somehow more likely to be misused.
For instance very powerful algorithms (well, more like categories) like deep learning can be used because of buzz when the data volume would instead suggest a different approach less prone to overfitting, like logistic regression or random forests.
Or maybe sometimes a machine learning model is sought or developed, when some good old-fashioned statistics analysis could serve better.
It really depends on the situation, no algorithm or technique is intrinsically bad of course, but it’s important to run a proper requirement analysis upfront and do some research to understand what suits best the problem we are facing.

Marcello La Rocca

Thanks again Agrita Ga, this was a challenging and interesting question, it was fun to reason about it!
I’ll try to think about other examples, and maybe I’ll add to the thread.
Also if you have follow up questions, please, by all means!

Agrita Ga

Delighted and ecstatic to hear this was interesting for you!
And obviously great to pick up your brain on this. 🧠
I also feel that sometimes misuses or using something due to familiarity comes from some personal boilerplate function repos (I’m guilty of this), when you need to do quick and dirty coding and don’t think about efficiency that much - at least while it does not impact actual correctness of outputs. But then again, I guess, the keywords here are quick and dirty. 😅
And ahh, the great hype around machine learning. Quite often the hype and fanciness stays with the model in a notebook when one has to deploy (read: also maintain and debug) overly complex, super fancy machine learning model where the problem could have been solved in way easier manner.

Agrita Ga

Related question to this thread, so won’t create new one (but if you think this deserves separate thread, I’ll separate it out) - your thoughts on dataframes as data structures? Obviously it serves a purpose - data people think in dataframes, but maybe in general - overused?

Marcello La Rocca

Hmm… 🤔
Do you mean something like Panda’s or Spark’s dataframes?
Yeah, it’s a good take - I mean everything can be useful or overkill, depending on the task.
I’d say that whenever you need to manually run some analysis, inspect data, even prototype a model, then a dataframe is very convenient.
Using it in the middle of a data pipeline, instead, would feel a bit like overkill to me - but it might just be a personal preference, of course.
What do you think instead?

Agrita Ga

Yes, exactly - R’s, panda’s, spark’s, etc. dataframes.
As I originally started with R, I have to say that I’m very skewed into liking dataframes and often designing logic that is somewhat dataframe specific. However, I remember when Spark introduced dataframes, some developers had hard time adjusting from RDDs to DataFrames - as they explained, you have to manipulate data in a different sequence that did not come naturally to them.
This is why I asked your thoughts on overused, as personally I sometimes feel that when you have gotten really used to dataframes, it’s sometimes hard to switch back.
Additional note and this is really not related to data structures, rather quick food for thought - with data manipulations I feel that dataframes (with all the in-built functions) gives us cleaner code and greater visibility what’s actually happening. However not saying that this also comes with speed.

Marcello La Rocca

Absolutely, I 100% agree.
And it’s always tricky when you have to switch to a different way of doing things… I guess the important part is making sure one is switching for a good reason, not just to embrace the latest trend/news.
But for dataframes, I fully underwrite your comment, it does help writing cleaner and better structured code, and that’s why I was thinking that anything that’s highly interactive or anyway with a relevant human factor is good use case for it.

Matthew Emerick

Hello, Marcello La Rocca. Thank you very much for doing this.
How do you differentiate between an easy/fundamental/intermediate algorithm and an advanced algorithm?

Marcello La Rocca

Hi Matthew Emerick, it’s a pleasure! Thanks a lot for your questions.
Let me try to answer them in order (and inline).

Marcello La Rocca

The first one is very interesting: I suppose there isn’t a single answer to this, and that it’s a bit subjective.
There are, however, some criteria that can be used, for example

  • If an algorithm/data structure is built upon other algos/DSs, or it’s a more advanced version of another DS: for instance:
    ◦ A priority queue is a more complex version of a queue
    Dijkstra’s algorithm use priority queues as part of it’s logic
    Breadth First Search is a simplified version of Dijkstra’s, which in turn can be seen as a simplified version of A*. And so on…
  • If an algorithm requires previous knowledge, or math knowledge: take the discrete Fourier transform, just on top of my head
  • How complex is an algorithm: at a glance, looking at the code or just its description, you can immediately see that BTrees are more complicated than Binary Search Trees.
Matthew Emerick

What are the main problems these algorithms solve?

Marcello La Rocca

In general? Well I think there are several categories…
It can be storing and querying data (many data structures revolve around this, in the end), or it can be processing data (DFT, ransac, but also ML algorithms)

Marcello La Rocca

Of course feel free to follow up on this topic!

Matthew Emerick

What algorithms do you cover that most books do not?

Marcello La Rocca

Terrific question, thanks for asking!
First, I think the unique value is that we cover a set of advanced algorithms that can’t be found in any single other book: from space-aware search to machine learning to genetic algorithms.
If we look at the individual algorithms/DSs, I think

  • no other book covers SS+-trees and OPTICS (a clustering algorithm), distributed clustering using MapReduce
  • few or no books books cover k-d trees and R-trees, algorithms to draw graphs in the plane, DBSCAN (another clustering algorithm) , Tries, Bloom filters
    But also I’d say that, last but not least, for the rest of the material, I tried to present it with a different angle, explaining the theory but also discussing how to use these algorithms in practice
Matthew Emerick

What do you recommend we read before reading your book?

Marcello La Rocca

Grokking algorithms is a nice introduction to algorithms for beginners and people just approaching the topic.
Another book that I loved and always recommend to have a quick bootstrap is Skiena’s The algorithm design manual

Matthew Emerick

What do you recommend we read after?

Marcello La Rocca

Depending on what you liked most on the book, there are many different topics that one could follow up. I tried to add links within each chapter to books and papers that can help the readers dig deeper into each topic.
Just for the sake of it, a few suggestions that I also mentioned at the end of my book:

  • Grokking Artificial Intelligence Algorithms
  • Algorithms and Data Structures for Massive Datasets
  • Grokking Machine Learning
Rodney Silva

I know that data structures is a very difficult topic in computer science. What do you think is the best way to study with this book in order to absorb all the knowledge presented?

Marcello La Rocca

Hi Rodney Silva! Thanks for bringing this up, that’s a good question, I’m glad I get the chance to talk about this.
So, first of all, I’d say: what do we mean when we think about absorbing all the knowledge?
I know not everyone might share this view, but the way I see algorithms (and the way I was thought about it), the goal should not be remembering by heart every detail of each algorithm .
When I was in college and I followed algorithms 101, my lecturer was clear to us: “your goal is to learn that these algorithms do exist, and know what they do and when they should be applied. This way, whenever you will need them, you can pick up this textbook from your shelf and refresh your memory”.

Marcello La Rocca

So every time I do a class or a talk about algorithms, I tell the same to the audience: try to grasp the fundamentals of each topic, and then you can take it from there when you need it.

Marcello La Rocca

Complementary to that, we tried to provide the possibility of an incremental approach to the readers, organizing chapters so that you can stop at different points, or skip sections, depending on what you are really interested about:

  • There is an introductory section for each (most) chapters explaining a problem, trying to solve it in different ways, and showing pros and cons of a few data structures/algorithms
  • Then the chapter usually focuses on a single data structure, going deep into its logic, and then the implementation details
  • In some chapters, there are clearly marked advanced sections where we explain the theory behind the algorithm just described
  • In most chapters, there is a section about practical ways of using the algorithm or data structures just introduced.
Marcello La Rocca

So, for instance, you could skim first skim through chapters reading about the problems, then try to use the code (you can get implementations from our repo on github, or use a library implementing the same algo), then go deeper into into the theory and try to implement a DS/algo yourself (good exercise especially if you are preparing for interviews), and finally you can delve into the theory to understand why something works that way.

Marcello La Rocca

Or, alternatively, you could also use this book as a catalog matching problems to algorithms, skim through it to understand what you could reuse and in what situations, and then when you find yourself facing a (now) familiar problem, you can resort to the book and delve into the details.
I’d say we tried to write the book in a way that gives you some leeway and lets you decide how to learn best, given your needs

luckylittle

Hi Marcello La Rocca, I have a question about graphs and implementing them. Mathematical representation makes it clear on the paper, but what’s the best way to store them into a data structure and how should we store edges? What are the different approaches and potential pros and cons, please?

Marcello La Rocca

Hi luckylittle, thanks for your question and sorry for the delay! (I guess you’ll only find it tomorrow morning, sorry!)
Luckily enough, I spent some time writing an intro to graphs in chapter 14, and I go through the details of exactly these questions: you can read more about it here: https://livebook.manning.com/book/algorithms-and-data-structures-in-action/chapter-14/v-14/30
To give you a short answer, yes indeed, that’s a very good point, there is a difference between the math representation and the actual implementation.
It is possible to implement graphs as algebraic data structures (so following the mathematical definition): these implementations, if correct, provides a few advantages (like guaranteeing you’ll have a consistent and valid graph), but usually have two main disadvantages:

  1. Performance (they are slooooow)
  2. Notation might be a tad verbose and cumbersome (although in some languages, mostly functional languages, you can get around this)
Marcello La Rocca

More practical implementations of course do exist, and the main difference between them is exactly how you store edges (a critical point):

  1. Adjacency lists: each vertex has an adjacency list where outgoing edges are stored
  2. Adjacency matrix: rows and columns are labeled with vertices, and cell (v,u) contains the edge from v to u, or it’s empty if there is none
  3. Incidence matrix, a matrix whose rows are vertices and columns are edges; each cell it’s either a 0/1 (0 if the edge is not incident on the vertex, for edge e=u->v, cells (u,e) and(v,e) would be 1), or can hold the edge’s weight.
    Each representation has pros and cons:
  4. adjacency list is used for sparse graphs, and better if the graph is dynamic (vertices-wise)
  5. adjacency matrix always require quadratic space, but for dense graphs this is asymptotically irrelevant, and it can speed up some algorithm (Floyd-Warshall, transitive closure etc…)
  6. incidence matrix is convenient for multigraphs, and also can speed up some algorithms
Marcello La Rocca

Then, beyond the representation, or once you choose it, there is another question connected to the implementation: for instance, in the adjacency list representation, how do you implement edges?
Do you need a class for them, and keep references to the vertices? And then how do you ensure consistency when you update the graph?
A talk a bit about this at the link I shared above, but you can also check out a practical implementation (and read about the design) here: https://github.com/mlarocca/jsgraphs/blob/master/readme/tutorial.md

luckylittle

Oh wow, this is very comprehensive answer. I had a look at chapter 14.1.2 Graphs as Algebraic Types and it is fantastic - exactly what I need. Let me also have a look at your GitHub. Many thanks 🙏

Marcello La Rocca

Perfect! You are welcome, glad I could help!

Matthew Emerick

Just want to thank Marcello La Rocca again for doing this and especially for the detailed answers to my questions.

Vladimir Finkelshtein

What are some major recent advances in algorithms? I have read somewhere that multiplication of large numbers is now done in n log n, but I guess this only has importance as a trivia question.

Marcello La Rocca

Hi Vladimir Finkelshtein! Thanks for your question, this is a really interesting topic.
So, first things first. Well, actually, last things first, as I’d like to start from the second part of your question.
I suppose you refer to this method https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02070778/document
to multiply two integers, presented a few yeas ago.
I’m not sure it has been validated by peer reviews yet, but that would certainly be a breakthrough in their field.
And by the way, it would be a super-important one also in practice, because multiplying large integers is crucial in many fields, especially in cryptography - often used when encrypting streams of data or communications.
On the other end, while knowing its existence could be interesting for mere trivia questions, I doubt it would be relevant as an interview question: the method uses a fast Fourier transform with 1729 dimensions, it would take more than an interview to explain it 😄

Marcello La Rocca

A few more of recent breakthroughs (well, for a given value of “recent”)

Vladimir Finkelshtein

I meant that the previous multiplication algorithms already gave something close to n log n. And the implicit constants are not specified in either algorithm. In encryption people rarely use numbers with more than 1024 digits, so it is unclear if the asymptotic improvement will be relevant on this scale.
Thanks for the list. Surprised to see Shitov’s result here. It is not clear to me what is the application of it outside combinatorics though.

Marcello La Rocca

Oh I see, sorry for misunderstanding.
Well, as you said, if it is going to be relevant in practice, it’s going to depend on the constant multiplication factors, and on the actual implementations. Also consider that we might higher security in the future, so the scale could go up (if we have the hardware to support it).
About Shitov’s result: indeed, that’s mostly a theoretical result, but still, quite impressive (also, I’m partial to graphs theory 😄 )

Rodney Silva

What was the most difficult chapter to write in this book? Why?

Marcello La Rocca

Hey Rodney Silva, thanks for the question!
I think the hardest chapters to write for me were chapter 10 (similarity search trees) and chapter 13 (distribute clustering using MapReduce).
Both because the topics were more complex, because I had to do a lot of research on them to make sure I had a good understanding and I could explain all the topics in the best possible way, and because there was little or no material at all available about these topics.
For SS+trees and OPTICS, in particular, I had to dig research papers, with no implementation of these algorithms to compare to, or to be used to validate mines.
So it’s been challenging but also fun 😃

Agrita Ga

If you’d write vol II of the book or if you’d add more chapters, which algorithms and/or data structures you’d be most excited to cover?

Marcello La Rocca

Thanks for asking Agrita Ga !
Interesting, let me think about this…
I think it would be great to write another book focusing on graphs, like taking and expanding what I have from this book, going deeper into some topics I just touched in this book, like Bellman-Ford, Floyd-Warshall, the maximum flow algorithms.
But also having a part of the book about dynamic graphs, a hot topic today.

Marcello La Rocca

Perhaps what I’d enjoy even more would be writing a book about genetic algorithms, with a first part expanding chapter 18 of AAaDS (like, 1 chapter for crossover, one for natural selection, and so on), and then including many more in-depth examples of practical problems that one could solve using GAs

Amruta

Hey Marcello La Rocca!
Hope you are doing well!
I have a very basic question to start with, What was your major motivation/idea behind authoring this book?

Amruta

Also, there are many books being written on Data structures and Algorithms in recent times, how is your book different/unique from the others?
Last question, Which algorithms are your favorite/preferred ones? Do you have any list ?

Marcello La Rocca

Hi Amruta, I’m great thanks! How about you?
Thanks a lot for your questions! Let me try to answer them in order (in this thread).
So, the first question is a tricky one 😄
First, you need to know that I have been working on this book for 5 years!
It’s been long enough for me to forget why on Earth I had started… or arguably even to start regretting it 😂
I’m just kidding, of course… well, more or less. It’s kind of hard to remember exactly when the idea started taking form. I can say that algorithms (and in particular graph theory and evolutionary algorithms) are my passion beyond work; back then I was regularly writing on a blog platform, Sitepoint - mostly I was writing about JavaScript. So I thought I wanted to prove myself and write about something I really liked, because it could be fun, it would give me a chance to learn more about these topics, and last but not least, it might help me in my career.

Marcello La Rocca

there are many books being written on Data structures and Algorithms in recent times, how is your book different/unique from the others?
That’s an excellent question, thanks for giving me a chance to tackle it!
Some reasons I think makes this book different:

  1. The unique set of topics it covers. There are some topics that can’t be found in any other books, like SS+trees and distributed clustering algorithms, but also I’m not aware of any book that starts from he basics and covers in a single place tries, k-d trees, cache, graphs, evolutionary algorithms, etc…
  2. The approach used is some sort of middle ground between textbooks and practical guides. Or better, it tries to get the best from both worlds, explaining the theory but also giving a clear practical approach to the reader, describing the problems that can be solved with an algo/DS, and how you can employ them. We even go into profiling and all the considerations that should be made to decide what data structure best fit a given problem, and I believe that’s one of the greatest pros of this book.
  3. The book is structured (or at least, we tried to structure it) such that you can read it at many different levels, depending on what you are interested in: an overview, practical approaches, or in-depth theoretical considerations
Marcello La Rocca

Which algorithms are your favorite/preferred ones? Do you have any list ?
That would be a long list!!! 😄
OK, let me think… the ones that I really really like the most…

  • Genetic algorithm, that’s probably my favourite (also being a meta-algorithm, it comprises a lot of variety!)
  • Dijkstra’s and A* (know them by hearth by now)
  • MapReduce (OK, that’s a programming model, to be picky) because it’s so simple and elegant but so powerful at the same time
  • The fast Fourier transform (because when you actually get to understand it, it’s like 🤯 )
Amruta

Thankyou so much Marcello La Rocca for explaining my questions in such detail! Your answers are really helpful for beginners in this field (like me). Appreciate them :)

Marcello La Rocca

You are welcome Amruta! 🙂
I’m glad it helped, feel free to ask any time if you have follow ups or if you just could use some advice!

Rodney Silva

How much time did it take to research and write this book?

Marcello La Rocca

Good question Rodney Silva! 🙂
So, it took me 5 years to get from the initial idea to having it published.
I had finished writing it a little longer than a year ago, then it took some time to polish it, and make it production-ready (with a lot of help from the publisher and the hard work of a lot of great people).
In terms of work-hours, I think I spent somewhere between 2000 and 3000 hours working on it. Maybe something more.
For each chapter, I’d start with an idea for the topic, then come up with a few viable examples that would demonstrate the algorithm, and possibly discuss it with the editors.
Once I had an outline for the chapter, I’d start researching the topic in-depth (also to see if and how it was covered in other publications).
This could well take a week or two, depending on how much free time I had.
Then I’d write the code for the chapter, also to make sure I understood the topic in-depth, and test it through.
When I was confident enough, or in parallel, I would start to write the story, i.e. the narration of the chapter. Then we’d go through several reviews of the intermediate drafts

Lalit Pagaria

Does your book cover LSM tree, Bloom filter and Indexing (B+ tree, inverted index etc)? Even though they are closely associated with DBs but seeing their use for highly scalable system design.

Marcello La Rocca

Hi Lalit Pagaria, thanks for your question!
So:

  • LSM tree, no
  • B+ tree, a little (they are introduced when talking about R-trees)
  • Bloom filters yes, there is a chapter on them
    The whole part 2 is dedicated to multidimensional data and there is a chapter on k-d trees, also used for DB indexing. An another chapter, the one with an intro to B-trees and R-trees, focusing on SS+trees, which are also at scaling on high dimensional datasets (arguably better than k-d trees and R-trees)
Lalit Pagaria

Thanks Marcello La Rocca. I never knew about SS+ Tree. Looks like good reason to read you book 🙂

Marcello La Rocca

Thanks Lalit! You can take a peek of these similarity search trees here on Manning’s livebooks
https://livebook.manning.com/book/algorithms-and-data-structures-in-action/chapter-10/v-14/107
I hope you enjoy it!

Doink

Marcello La Rocca I wanted to extend Agrita Ga question’s a bit more you mentioned that Deep Learning and in general Machine Learning algorithms are overused and misused so do you feel we stick to logistic regression or what alternatives do you suggest. Also what is your take on Federated Learning paradigm of doing things? Federated Learning tends to follow a somewhat Map Reduce type of pattern. Will we see you covering Federated Learning in your second volume?
Mainly which techniques would you prefer for distributed scalable algorithms which can protect privacy.

Marcello La Rocca

Hello Doink, thanks for following up on this.
So wait, no, I wouldn’t argue we should in general stick to logistic regression! 😄
What I’m saying is that each problem has different characteristics and it might be best solved with a different algorithm.
If your dataset is “small” (let’s say less than a million data points?) then probably a powerful model like deep learning might overfit it (well, you could try to mitigate using regularization, like dropout, but still, there will be a threshold for the size of the data below which some models will overfit)
Anyway, it’s hard to tell precisely in advance, and the best guideline to follow is “listening to the data”: trying out several models, training and testing them and comparing the results to see what model fits best and generalizes best your data.

Marcello La Rocca

Then there is another orthogonal question that is about transparency, i.e. interpretability, of these models.
To that extent, deep learning models are black boxes, and it’s hard to interpret them, which can lead to all kinds of unwanted biases and unexpected behaviors.
From that point of view, I think that today we should really make an effort to design and use interpretable models, especially when health or life-changing decisions are made with the help of a model.
A powerful interpretable alternative to neural networks are for instance GAMs, described for instance here: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=477576069385721
Recently Denis Rothman wrote a wonderful book about explainable AI, you can take a look here
https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6802898159904276480/
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1800208138
A free resource on the topic
https://christophm.github.io/interpretable-ml-book/

Marcello La Rocca

About federated learning, I think that’s an extremely promising technique; it’s also not applicable (or advisable) in all situations, but indeed whenever data sharing would not be possible (either because of privacy or because the data is too heterogeneous) it seems like the way to go.
Side benefit, as you note, distributing the load allows scaling out your system (at a price, of course, because the sum of the total resources needed might be higher than the ones of a centralized model - though not necessarily more expensive than that - and the final result might not be as good as the theoretical centralized equivalent).
Privacy-wise, as an alternative I could only think about anonymizing data… but one way or another, if you share it, you reveal something about your source (sort of a fingerprint).
But although harder, I suppose that even a model could be “reverse-engineered” to discover some statistics about the dataset on which it was trained. So it all depends on the level of security/privacy you need.
Anyway, yeah, if I wrote a follow up book, definitely both interpretable ML and federated learning could be among the topics I’d like to cover!

Doink

Marcello La Rocca I love the long answers. Regarding Federated Learning for what kind of applications do you feel it’s advisable and for which use-cases do you feel they are not advisable?
Also are you aware of the other approaches in the privacy preserving ML framework such as differential privacy, homomorphic encryption,secure multiparty computation and trusted execution environment?
Also Privacy and Fairness don’t go hand in hand.

Marcello La Rocca

😄
Federated Learning: I think it heavily depend on the context, as we discussed when privacy is a concern or data is too big to be processed in a centralized way.
Hard to say a priori which industries or categories… just thinking out loud, I think something like a joint venture between several companies, where no single company wants to share its data with the others, could be the ideal case.
But also anything related to health, for instance something that requires collecting data from several hospitals across the Country: this could allow developing a much better model, without sharing PIIs outside of each medical center.

Marcello La Rocca

Privacy and Fairness don't go hand in hand
Well, I mean, true sometimes, but we could struggle to find ways to make it work. Sometimes it might feel like privacy might be used as an excuse to deny fairness, but that’s another story 🤔

Marcello La Rocca

Also are you aware of the other approaches in the privacy preserving ML framework such as differential privacy, homomorphic encryption,secure multiparty computation and trusted execution environment
I have to admit I’m no expert on this field, I’ll be sure to dig and read more about these approaches, they look fairly interesting.
Maybe Alexey Grigorev can answer better about this?

Alexey Grigorev

No, unfortunately I can’t! But if there’s a book about differential privacy, I can try to invite the authors 😃

luckylittle

Marcello La Rocca Sorry to ask about graphs again. I had a look at your lightweight library to model graphs - JSGraphs , specifically the BFS (https://github.com/mlarocca/jsgraphs/blob/master/readme/tutorial.md#bfs) and based on the examples there, you are showing examples of directed graphs (all the edges point in a direction), e.g. first example is 1 -> 3 -> 4 -> 6 -> 7. Can these methods be theoretically used in scenarios with mixed graphs (some edges are bidirectional, few are not) - specifically to obtain connections between cities, e.g. some big cities are hubs connected to other big cities, but some villages only have one road in?

Marcello La Rocca

Hey luckylittle, no reason to be sorry! On the contrary - graph theory is one of my favorite topics!!! 😄
The scenario you describe is normally modeled with a directed graph, where one-way roads are modeled with a single directed edge, and two-way roads, instead, correspond to a pair of directed edges.
Directed graphs are more flexible, in this sense, because an undirected graph can be translated to a directed one using this trick (using a pair of directed edges for each undirected edge); the opposite instead is not true.
Then if we move to multigraphs, those can have multiple directed edges between each pair of vertices. To have a parallel, one could think about a situation where multiple edges can only be used under some conditions… like maybe the villages in your examples are connected by roads, but also through canals, or there are flights between them, or sideroads that can only be traveled with a dirt bike… you get the idea 🙂
The good news is that BFS can work with all these graphs 🙂
Does that answer your question, and did I understand it correctly?

luckylittle

I’m glad that I tickled your fancy with your favourite topic 😆 It certainly does explain a few things which I was not entirely sure about.

luckylittle

On a different note, I had a look at this very subject in your book (via Manning’s 5 minutes free preview, so really just skimmed through it!) and in that short period of time I had a feeling of reading an “academic” journal. Would you say that your book is going to explain these advanced topics in a way that non-academic people will understand? Maybe I should have another look tomorrow…

Marcello La Rocca

That’s a good point. So, we tried to balance the “textbook” part with a more practical approach. So yeah, there will be a theoretical part that’s gonna cover the topic a bit more in-depth than average “hands-on” books.
But in each chapter there is also room for examples and a more practical approach.
For graphs in particular, since I was only writing a quick introduction, that feeling of “academicness” (I think I just made up a word, but bear with me) is probably stronger than in other chapters.
For comparison, I’d suggest you could take a look at Grokking Algorithms https://livebook.manning.com/book/grokking-algorithms/chapter-6/
which has a less formal approach, and you can pick whichever works best for you right now
(actually I always strongly recommend Grokking Algorithms as a primer on algorithms)

luckylittle

Awesome, thanks for the tips and explanation. Keep doing a good job!

Rodney Silva

What is the most complex data structure to master in this book? Why?

Marcello La Rocca

Hey Rodney Silva, nice question 🙂
My vote would go to k-d tree and Ss-trees, because they work in multidimensional spaces and for our brains (well, at least for mine) it is hard to wrap around these concepts, as it is hard to visualize them.
Also, and especially for Ss-trees, the logic of the algorithms is quite complex, and it requires a fair amount of studying and writing down examples to get all the possible cases right.

Wendy Mak

Hi Marcello, in your book repo you used 3 different languages to illustrate the various algorithms– is there language(s) that you find easier to implement algorithms in?

Marcello La Rocca

Hi Wendy Mak, that’s an excellent question, thanks for giving me a chance to discuss this!
First thing I need to say, is that I consider myself language-agnostic: in my career I used many programming languages, and more or less I like them all - or hate them all, on bad days 😄
I strongly believe that programming languages are tools, and so you need to pick the right one for the task you are presented.
For instance, the three languages I currently used on the repo could hardly be more heterogeneous: Java, JavaScript and Python!
Each of them has different characteristics, so for instance Python is great to quickly write prototypes, because you don’t have to worry too much about the type system and it has a very rich and intuitive syntax for lambdas, generators, list comprehension etc.
On the other hand, though, a strongly typed language like Java take care of the static checking for you, which allows me to be more confident that my program is going to work (because types are checked by the compiler) and also to write less tests (because, say compared to JavaScript, if a function takes a int, I don’t need to test what happens when someone tries to pass it a string 🤦 )

Marcello La Rocca

OK, anyway, sorry for the digression. In a nutshell, which one is easier heavily depends on personal preference and on what one is more used to. And, needless to say, on what you are going to implement.
So for me, for instance, for containers it was probably easier to write them in Java (mostly for the reasons in my previous comment) while for anything machine-learning-related, a Python notebook was much easier (existing libraries and frameworks are another very relevant factor here)

Wendy Mak

also, if you are practicising implementing algorithms from scratch, how do you build test cases to check that it’s doing the correct thing? (since an incorrect or suboptimal implementation might still give you the correct answer?)

Marcello La Rocca

Ah! Tricky one! 😊
So… well, it is tricky, it’s actually the trickiest part. Just yesterday I was saying exactly this, that for example Ss+trees were the hardest for me to implement, because there was no existing implementation that I could use as a cornerstone.
But in my experience this is the norm, in my daily work I’m often in the same situation, and actually writing (good) tests is often the most time-consuming part of my work.
So, what you can do in these cases?
Well, you can start by going through the logic of the algorithm, reason in terms of edge cases, see if your code works when you get empty inputs (or null), unexpected values, large inputs, check that it fails when it’s supposed to, and finally try the regular cases.
If you are using a suite/framework, running test coverage can help you understand if you tested all the possible cases (but also, beware of the myth of 100% coverage…)
Incidentally, this sanity check is a process that can help you a lot also in interviews (you should always try to test your whiteboard code, starting from edge cases).

Marcello La Rocca

Bringing this to the next level, you might want to embrace TDD (test driven development) or BDD (behavior driven development). This means that you’d start by writing your tests based on the domain knowledge and requirements analysis you have, and only after you lay down enough tests to express how things should go in your expectation, only then you start writing the code (well, more or less - no need to be inflexible on this kind of things, but you get the idea)
Honestly I highly encourage TDD. Last piece of advice: have your test fail. This works perfectly with TDD: it’s important that you check that your tests initially (or at some point, before you finish implementing a feature) fail - this makes you more confident that you wrote a good, proper test (otherwise sometimes, by mistake, you can find out that your test is not actually checking what you were expecting)

Doink

Marcello La Rocca How to balance understanding depths and breadths of internals of any algorithm?

Marcello La Rocca

🤔 I’m not sure I understood your question correctly: what to you mean by depths and breadths? Do you mean having a high level understanding (breadths) vs knowing the inside-outs, the smallest details (depths) of an algorithm?

Doink

Marcello La Rocca Yes

Marcello La Rocca

Thanks for clarifying!
Then I’d say the most important thing (IMHO) is to learn the “breadths” part, getting a high level idea of what an algorithm do, where you can apply it, what problems you can solve.
Given that our memory is limited, it’s unlikely one can remember the details of all algorithms.
Instead, if one understands it at a high level, when the time comes one will be able to pick up that algorithm and go in depth to understand the algorithms internals and implement or adapt it.
Of course there are exceptions, for instance if you are specializing in a field, or if you are preparing for interviews, then you might wanna go in depth. Or likewise, for the basics: it’s better to get an in-depth understandings of basic algorithms, before starting to study the ones built upon them.

Rodney Silva

What’s your educational background?

Marcello La Rocca

Hey Rodney Silva, thanks for asking
So I studied software engineering in high school, then got my master degree in computer science (in my alma mater it was part of the Math department, so we were focusing more on math, algorithms, computability and complexity theory etc. than SE).
I’m also a PhD dropout (robotics and machine learning).
As for programming languages, I started with Turbo Pascal in high school, then since college I studied/worked with:

  • Java
  • Haskell
  • C
  • C++
  • Scheme
  • Fortran
  • JavaScript
  • Php
  • C#
  • COBOL
  • Python
  • Scala
  • Go
    I might be missing some more 😄
    But of course I’m not proficient in all of them, I daily work just with Java/JavaScript/Python/Scala
Alexey Shvets

Marcello La Rocca which programming language do you personally like the most?

Marcello La Rocca

Tricky question Alexey Shvets! 🤭
OK, let’s say that only considering the joy of programming and abstracting from any practical considerations, I’d pick Scala, because it’s elegant and expressive, it’s functional (I’m totally partial to functional programming) but it’s also concrete (and OO 😉 )

Ajay kumar saini

Hi Marcello La Rocca Thanks for doing this. I have few following questions (forgive me if you’ve already answered them, I am still going through your response 🙂 )

  • Which data structures or algorithms you use most frequently in daily engineering work?
  • Do you think using advanced data structure or algorithm could reduce code readability or code onboarding time?
  • When one shouldn’t use a particular data structure or algorithm even though it fits their use case?
Marcello La Rocca

Hi Ajay kumar saini thanks to you for your excellent questions!
Let me try to answer them here in order

Marcello La Rocca

Which data structures or algorithms you use most frequently in daily engineering work?
Nice one 🙂
Of course the basic containers are ubiquitous, can’t spend a day without using hashing or hash maps, for instance.
If we are talking about the advances ones, and the ones in the book, I’d say right now machine learning and as such gradient descent.
Cache would be a close second.

Marcello La Rocca

Do you think using advanced data structure or algorithm could reduce code readability or code onboarding time?
I think using the right data structure, and advanced data structures too, could improve code readability: especially if you reuse existing (well tested) libraries or anyway you do a good job encapsulating the data structure’s logic in its own class, it will make your daily code shorter, cleaner and clearer for who reads it.
As for the onboarding time, I think it can also speed it up: the most time when you are onboarding at a new position is spent, in my experience, in catching up with domain knowledge.
So if you don’t have to worry about the details of algorithms (be it sorting, queueing, running ransac on your radar data or whatever 😄 ) you can focus on the domain knowledge and catch up more quickly.
(please feel free to let me know if I haven’t captured well the sense of your question)

Marcello La Rocca

When one shouldn't use a particular data structure or algorithm even though it fits their use case?
Excellent question! There could be many complementary questions you could and should ask when deciding if a given data structure/algorithm fits your problem; some are strictly technical, some are more business-related - let me enumerate some of them (just thinking on my feet here):

  • Are you operating in a multithreaded environment, and is the DS thread safe?
  • What’s the performance of this DS/algo? Does it scale with the size of the input I have?
  • Is there a library (well tested and widely adopted) that implements this DS/algo
    ◦ If so, is it open source?
    ◦ Not open source:
    ▪︎ Can I trust it?
    ▪︎ Is there any privacy concern?
    ▪︎ Is there any safety treat in using it?
  • If no existing implementation exists or can be used:
    ◦ Is there someone within the company that has the knowledge to write it?
    ◦ Is it worth using this DS/algo over a given alternative (which might be less ideal, but you wouldn’t need to implement from scratch)?
    And so on… 😉
Doink

how much of data structures does one actually write? Isn’t everything sorted by a well tested library?
Also how often does one have to deal with thread safety?

Marcello La Rocca

how much of data structures does one actually write?
That heavily depends on the kind of position.
You could spend an entire career working in machine learning, without having to write a single ML algorithm. You can of course make great progress and killer apps that puts together NLP and object recognition or gesture recognition, and never write a transformer nor gradient descent: you can do it all by plugging together ML libraries.
Same goes for algorithms, every developer uses a lot of great algorithms every day without even realizing it (just think about the graph algorithms implemented by your compiler or by the garbage collector or, to stay more code-related, the containers in the standard libraries).

Marcello La Rocca

Isn't everything sorted by a well tested library?
Well… not so fast.
Yeah, it’s possible that you can find everything you need already implemented and tested. Even more, if you find such a library, you should rather use it and avoid re-inventing the wheel and rewriting something from scratch.
But, that’s not always the case. A few examples of situations where you might need to write your own implementation:

  • You (or your company) are adopting a fairly recent language, for which there aren’t many libraries already available.
  • You need to implement a niche algorithm (because it’s a bottleneck in your pipeline and you can use any improvement). This can happen also with more popular or even mainstream languages, for instance try to find implementations for OPTICS, DeLiClu or Ss+trees in Python or JavaScript
  • You need to customize an algorithm for your peculiar needs. I’d say this is by far the most common case. You might still be able to use a generic implementation, but adapting it might be too slow or consume too much memory.
    And I probably also miss other good cases
Marcello La Rocca

Also how often does one have to deal with thread safety?
That again depends on the position… I can tell you that I currently work on the backend of web applications, and I have to deal almost every day with writing thread-safe code.
And in my previous jobs on data infrastructure, I found it even more important.
Remember that thread-safety is a precondition to scaling out.

Ajay kumar saini

Thanks Marcello La Rocca for your insightful answers 🙂.

Ajay kumar saini

Hi Marcello La Rocca I saw in previous threads that you are also learning quantum computing. Any good recommendation for practical resources for beginners?

Marcello La Rocca

Hey Ajay kumar saini, of course!
Some great books
https://manning.com/books/learn-quantum-computing-with-python-and-q-sharp
book 1, book 2, book 3, book 4, book 5. (here a bit more info on each of them in this Twitter thread)

Marcello La Rocca

I hope it helps!

Ajay kumar saini

Thanks for sharing. It does 🙂

Jasper

Thank you for adding me! 🙂

Filmetto App

Hello Marcello La Rocca, hope you fine, and thanks for doing this question/answers!
I would like to ask you:
For you, for who is this book? Let say, for example, I am a newbie data engineer, and want to go further in this career path, does your book will help me?
What is the knowledge the reader will need to have before approaching your book?
Thanks!

Jasper

Although I haven’t read the book yet, I did browse through the chapter contents on github. During my previous course at college on data structures we discussed various of the mentioned algorithms and learned about implementing them.
This book is a treasure of knowledge, in particular if you want to do high level design of systems and go beyond the basics. I can definitely recommend it for your career. I grew so excited about the book that I’ll likely end up buying it if I don’t win a copy. 😄

Marcello La Rocca

Thanks a lot Jasper for your kind words! I really appreciate them, and hearing comments like this is the best motivation to write a follow up!
Any chance you’d like to repeat that in a review on Amazon? 🙂 Just kidding! 😄 (although well, if you would like to, it would be a great review 🙂 )

Marcello La Rocca

Filmetto App thanks for your questions! Let’s see:
For you, for who is this book?
Ideally it’s for beginners with some experience in coding/computer science. I’d say it’s for anyone who would like to discover more about algorithms and good practices in software engineering.

Marcello La Rocca

Let say, for example, I am a newbie data engineer, and want to go further in this career path, does your book will help me?
What I tried to do in this book is, besides talking about algorithms, also showing good practices, how to approach a problem in a systematic and rational way, how to reason about requirements and through that choose what’s the best data structure or algorithm to apply, and how to profile your implementation to find bottlenecks and compare different implementations to pick the best one.
If I managed to do all that I was hoping for, then I think it might indeed help you in that situation.

Marcello La Rocca

What is the knowledge the reader will need to have before approaching your book?
The strictly required knowledge is just some basic math and basic programming (understanding conditionals, loops etc.).
There is no expectation of previous knowledge of any specific programming language, because the book uses pseudocode to explain each algorithm (so the emphasis is on the logic of the algorithm, not the implementation details).
And actual code is also provided on github in 3 (for now, more coming) different programming languages, so there will be great choice.
For what concerns CS knowledge, of course if you had taken a CS 101 course it would help, but the book also has appendices explaining algorithms basics, from big-O notation and asymptotic analysis to core data structures (arrays, lists, stack, queue etc.).
That should help even the beginners catch up - otherwise reading something like Grokking Algorithms before this book would also be a great alternative)

Jasper

Marcello La Rocca, being an author myself (although fiction and not non-fiction) I know how important good reviews are. I’d gladly repeat my comments there for you, but unfortunately I don’t have a copy of the book. I would love to review it though and see if I can get more people interested in buying the book there from you. 😀

Filmetto App

Thank you so much for taking the time to respond to my questions. It’s very clear and actually make me more willing to acquire your book 😄

Marcello La Rocca

Thank you both, I really appreciate it!

Marcello La Rocca

Jasper don’t worry about the review, they are not even open yet, it will be possible to write them only after the book is actually available (not just for pre-order). So, depending on the store, that might be end of June or beginning of July.
And anyway of course you should have a chance to read your copy first! BTW, good luck (to both of you) with the extraction!

Rodney Silva

Why do you think computer science bachelors suffer so much to pass in algos/ds interviews from Faang?

Marcello La Rocca

That’s a very interesting question.
Rodney Silva Just to understand better the scope of the question, do you mean bachelors suffered compared to master graduates? Or compared to other backgrounds?

Rodney Silva

They suffer in general, for other backgrounds I think it’s even more difficult

Marcello La Rocca

Rodney Silva sorry for the delay!
So yeah, this is a very interesting issue, to me it’s also a problem.
I’ve had my fair share of interviews at Faang, some of them I failed, some others I passed. And then I have also been on the other side, the interviewer side.
One thing I could see is that most of the time the interview process is focused on topics that are not part of the daily work of people.
So for many of these interviews, you get asked questions about coding challenges, and you have to write code on a whiteboard - which isn’t exactly the normal setup in our day-to-day activities, right?
If you ask me why it is that people struggle so much with these interviews, I think a few reasons might be:

  • algo/dss are not part of the normal work for many positions
  • b/c of that, people tend to forget them after a while
  • In general algorithms are sometimes (maybe even often) neglected in people’s career, in favor of more practical topics
    ◦ for those who had college education, algorithms usually are studied early in the curriculum
    ◦ for those who went through other paths, often algorithms were not even part of their studies
  • Moreover, these interviews ask you to face these challenges in a very short time - some people are good at thinking on their feet and coming up with quick answers, for other people this is more stressful and difficult.
  • And so if one can’t come up with an answer quickly, is also more likely to panic and block, of course
    So you see, in short, the only way to cope with the last couple of points above is practicing hard, but not everyone has the chance to spend so much time, nor people expect to need it, before being in such an interview.
Tim Becker

Hi Marcello La Rocca! Really cool book! And thank you for answering our questions. I appreciate it a lot. I also have a few:

  • In your opinion, which are the algorithms and data structures a data scientist would benefit from knowing the most?
  • What is your background and how did it lead you to writing this book? What was your motivation to learn more about algorithms?
  • Why did you use Java and Javascript for most of the examples (github)?
  • If you are working on a programming task, how to you approach the challenge of finding the best algorithm or data structure for the task?
Marcello La Rocca

Hi Tim Becker! Thanks a lot, I appreciate it 🙂
Let’s go with your question below:

Marcello La Rocca

In your opinion, which are the algorithms and data structures a data scientist would benefit from knowing the most?
Ah, tricky one… They would benefit from all of them? 😄
OK, kidding, I don’t expect you let me get off the hook so easily 😛
Let’s see… of course, all algorithms related to machine learning, because it would help them to understand better how to apply these techniques.
Probably MapReduce programming model is also going to be gold.
Then besides that I’d say it really depends on the area one is focusing on 🤔

Marcello La Rocca

What is your background and how did it lead you to writing this book? What was your motivation to learn more about algorithms?
I have a master degree in computer science, major in AI and algorithms.
Then I spent most of my career working on web applications and data processing, but I always tried to keep up to date and do some research on algorithms.
Evolutionary algorithms, graph theory, are my passion (within CS), and writing a book about them seemed a good way to combine business and pleasure

Marcello La Rocca

Why did you use Java and Javascript for most of the examples (github)?
And Python as well (OK, a bit less!)
So, JavaScript: because when I started working on this book, a long time ago, the idea was to focus on “Algorithms and DSs in JavaScript”, or in general for the frontend.
So I had written a lot of code in JavaScript, and moreover I was working on a library for graphs in JavaScript (lately rewritten into https://github.com/mlarocca/jsgraphs)
Then Manning accepted to publish the book and we pivoted to a more broad audience, so I wanted to add a typical backend language, and Java was the mainstream one with which I was the most comfortable

Marcello La Rocca

If you are working on a programming task, how to you approach the challenge of finding the best algorithm or data structure for the task?
Ah, that’s tricky! How much time do we have to talk about this? 😄
So there are many aspects to keep in mind, but one thing applies IMHO: while you don’t always need the absolute best possible solution, the most important thing is to avoid all the bad solutions.
Let me explain: it might change little if you use mergesort instead of quicksort, but it’s more important that you avoid selectionsort, which is definitely going to be slow.
Or even more, it can be fine using one of many heuristics that only slightly differ in their running time, but the important thing is to avoid brute-force search.

Marcello La Rocca

More specifically, I try this approach.

  • First, I clarify the requirements, both in terms of goals and resources available
  • Then, I start reasoning/researching about the possible solutions
    ◦ I look for existing libraries that I can use
    ◦ If nothing off-the-shelf works, I search inside the company who could have the knowledge to implement a custom solution
    ◦ Then weigh the options and how much time they would take
    ◦ I try to pick the best affordable option, say the one that could get me the most value within those requiring a reasonable time (depending on requirements) or anyway those that are below the median.
  • Then once implemented I profile my code, and see if the algorithm is a bottleneck. If it is, and there is an available algorithm that (with some effort) can give an asymptotic improvement, I go for it. Of course this iterative approach only works if at the first step I choose a quick solution (either off-the-shelf or quickly implementable)
Tim Becker

Marcello La Rocca thank you 🙂 a lot to think about

Marcello La Rocca

You are very welcome! Please feel free to ping me any time if you have follow up questions 🙂

Rodney Silva

Do you think this book can have new editions in the future?

Marcello La Rocca

Well, it’s possible of course, it will depend on the publisher too.
But I think not necessarily, maybe it’s more likely to have a volume 2 🙂
The reason is that these concept age well, the book is (programming) language agnostic so it shouldn’t become outdated any time soon.
Of course there can be advancements in the field meanwhile, but those won’t likely invalidate or deprecate what’s discussed in the book (for instance, Ss+trees and R-trees didn’t made k-d trees obsolete, they are still relevant and preferable in some situations)

Rodney Silva

What kind of new advances would you like to see in the future for data structures?

Marcello La Rocca

Ah, good one! Rodney Silva
The one advance that I’d love to see is on the P vs NP problem.
I know, it’s a theory-intensive topic… but hey, if someone proved that P=NP (which I doubt is true, but you never know!) then we would have at least an algorithm that could be used to solve all problems in NP in polynomial time - that would be have huge practical consequences!
More realistically, I’d be excited to see new progresses in quantum algorithms, I think that’s going to be a hot topic in the next years, and many game-changing discoveries could be made there.
Restricting to data-structures in particular… I’d be looking forward to seeing new natively-distributed data structures that leverages even more parallelism. And maybe for Graphs, I’d like to see some open problems solved, maybe Zarankiewicz’s conjecture proven, that would be nice (well, at least for me, since I worked on the topic 😄 )

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  • On Friday, the authors decide who wins free copies of their book

To see other books, check the the book of the week page.

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